Response to the Vulnerable

Response to the Vulnerable

The prophetic voice of the Church is visible where the Church responds and advocate on behalf of the marginalised, the disadvantaged and vulnerable in the society. LUCSA heard the cry of the disadvantaged special school pupils in North West Province of South Africa. The community of Atamelang village have a school called Lialian Lehetla Special School with about 200 leaners with special needs. The school provides Socio-psyche services and vocational training for children with special learning needs.

The challenge for the school is that there is no kitchen and cool room where meals are prepared for children. LUCSA responded by assisting the school to build a kitchen and cool room with an amount P250,000.00.  The cheque was handed by the LUCSA Director and representatives of ELCSA- NT, ELCSA and LCSA pastors.

LUCSA Executive Director-Lilian Lehetla School

Responsible to the Vulnerable

Current Schoo-Kitchen Donated by LUCSA

Responsible to the Vulnerable
Posted by in Diakonia Desk
LWF Reformation 2017

LWF Reformation 2017

Reflect | Connect | Be Transformed

As we move towards the 2017 celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Lutheran Reformation, LUCSA is reflecting on how Lutheranism has impacted Africans, connecting with the global community with LWF, and opening our hearts towards where God is calling us to continually transform ourselves. Join our communion in the celebration by reading through what it means to be liberated by God’s grace!

The following resources have been provided by Lutheran World Federation, and you can access them by clicking here.

Liberated by God’s Grace

God’s grace is liberating! With this free gift we are able to be free ourselves. The theme for the 500th celebration of the reformation is centered on this gift of freedom. Yet, this gift is not just about salvation.

Salvation – Not for Sale

The gift of salvation is free. We will not be able to purchase our salvation, and we will not be able to sell it away. We must remember that this gift is precious, and that this is the central message of the doctrine of justification.

Human beings – Not for Sale

We are encouraged through this celebration to not just reflect on the past, but also to see the changes we need to make today. Every person is a gift and made perfect through God’s eyes, therefore we must be fully respected in her/his dignity and integrity. We need to address the practices that create or increase poverty by our churches.

Creation – Not for Sale

Humans are not the only precious thing that God created. Our earth has been given as a gift from God and we must work to end exploitative human domination and resource abuse of this gift. We must fully respect and protect the earth as God’s good creation.

Goals of 2017 Celebration

Strengthen the LWF Communion

We want our member churches to recognize the mutuality of being part of the global Lutheran communion and to get involved in regional and global preparations for Reformation 2017.

Deepen understanding of what it means to be Lutheran

We want our member churches to think and talk about how to be Lutheran churches in ongoing reformation in their current contexts.

Strengthen our ecumenical commitment

We want to explore with other Christian World Communions our calling in the world today and how we can respond together.

Reaffirm our commitment to justice and peace

We want our member churches to become a part of a joint diaconal and advocacy efforts to work actively for justice and peace

Global Youth Reformers Network

The Global Young Reformers Network is a group of young LWF members who are working to connect youth globally with what it means to be Lutheran, and the coming events of the reformation celebration.

Their current focus is to create dialogue between informed, inquisitive young reformers about what it means to be Lutheran through their personal stories.

Want to get involved? Join the network by clicking here.

Important Reformation Events

2015

January

Launch of the official Reformation 2017 website

March

Release of study materials written by authors from all LWF regions to explore Reformation 2017 theme

April

LWF interfaith conference presentations to include Christian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions

May

24-29th, Marangu 60th anniversary of the first meeting of all African Lutheran church leaders

June

Results of the LWF Task Force on  Mennonite reconciliation action in 2010

August

Global Young Reformers Network conference in Wittenburg

October

Theology after the Reformation conference

 

November

Launch of the Lutheran theology course taught by Lutheran professors from all seven LWF regions, to run through December

Advent

Joint Roman Catholic-Lutheran liturgical materials released

All Year

Women on the Move from Wittenberg to Windhoek: Ongoing Reformation project

2016

June

13-16th LWF hermeneutics workshop

June

16-21st LWF Council 2016 in Wittenberg

 

Reformation Day 2016

Women on the Move publication to be released

Advent

Anglican-Lutheran study materials released

2017

May

10-17th LWF Twelfth Assembly

October

Reformation day liturgical celebration

Posted by in The Lutheran World Federation
Peace and Unity – 9th LUCSA Assembly

Peace and Unity – 9th LUCSA Assembly

Former President of LUCSA, Bishop SVV. Nambala during the official opening of the 9th Assembly, at Premier Hotel, in Kempton Park.

Bishop Dr. Shekutaamba V.V. Nambala, the President of Lutheran Communion in Southern Africa (LUCSA) expressed his concern that up to date there are no females at the top leadership in the Southern African sub – region of Lutheran World Federation (LWF). The president expressed this during the official opening of the 9th LUCSA Assembly at Kempton Park in Johannesburg on the 1st September 2016

​Lutheran Communion in Southern Africa Joint Reformation Service

Mr. Collen Mafora
Soweto, South Africa 29 October 2016

The following member churches of the Lutheran Communion in Southern Africa (LUCSA), Evangelical Lutheran Church Southern Africa (ELCSA), Evangelical Lutheran Church in Southern Africa (ELCSA (N-T)), Lutheran Church Southern Africa (LCSA) and the Moravian Church Southern Africa (MCSA) have taken one small step towards the realization of a Joint Commemoration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in May 2017 by hosting a joint- reformation service at the Orlando Communal Hall on the 30th of October 2016 where over 1200 members attended the service.

The joint-reformation service was attended by Bishops, Deans, Pastors and throngs of ordinary members of these churches. The service was led by the bishops of the aforementioned churches, Dean M Mankga of ELCSA, assisting pastors, acolytes from the participating churches.

The theme of the sermon of the day which was delivered by the Rev Dr DP Tswaedi, the LUCSA Executive Director, said, “Putting a Face to Grace”. “It is an interesting and a wonderful day. While the world we live in is characterized by events that are dividing us, today we have to come to the Throne of God and as a family of God’’ said Bishop Tswaedi. The motto for the celebration was Joint-reformation service and the service truly displayed this sentiment as Bishops, Deans and Pastors from all these churches offered Holy Communion to the congregation in a joint spirit. This showed a united front throught the service and confirmed for the first time in a long time that Lutherans were indeed Lutherans. Colourful for that matter! This was further echoed by Bishop S Ngqakayi ‘when he said this was a step in a right to unite the church across the country not just in Gauteng province.

Attendees were reminded that in order for the church to prosper and be able to address the challenges of this century it needed members to continue to dedicate their time and efforts towards building a church that will provide for needs of its members and generations to come.

Posted by in Christian Education
LUCSA Assembly applauds the triennial report

LUCSA Assembly applauds the triennial report

Ms. Nonhlanhla Mokwena delivering her presentation.

JOHANNESBURG –Participants at the 9th LUCSA Assembly held at Premier Hotel on the second day, listened attentively to the Windhoek to Johannesburg Report presented by LUCSA Executive Director Rev. Dr. David Tswaedi. In a report, which covers 57 pages, Dr Tswaedi presented what the sub-region has done in the period from 2013 to 2016.

​Christian Education book 5 launches with a Training workshop

Ms. Gugu Mkhabela Benoni,
South Africa, 17 May 2016

25 young adults and pastors gathered to explore the newly published LUCSA Christian Education Resource Book 5 at eMseni Christian Center in Benoni, South Africa from 14-­‐17 May 2016. The training workshop was unique for participants as they discussed what it means to be a young African Lutheran in today’s context.

Rev. Othusitse Morekwa, LUCSA Diakonia Desk Officer and contributor for Book 5, urged the participants to reflect on the curriculum and how they can translate it into their own cultures.

“We ought to invite the Lord, dwell on the text, share what we have heard in our hearts, and pray together,” he urged.

The youth were eager to express their own understandings of culture and how the church can play a role both in their spiritual life and personal life.

Mr. David Daniels from the Moravian Church in South Africa (MCSA) took the idea a step further by asking, “How are we as a church guiding our young people? Is the church responsible for the current situations in our countries, and the youth? How can we take this book back to our churches and impact our youth and young adults?”

Ms. Tlago Oliphant from the Ecumenical Accompanier Palestine Programme in Israel (EAPPI) capacitated the participants in advocacy and conflict resolution skills.

“It is my duty to be a mouth piece and tell stories of those who can’t tell their own stories,” Ms. Oliphant shared.

She asked the participants to consider what changes they want to see in their communities, “and that whatever change we want to do, or might want to bring in the church, we ought consider the feelings of other people.”
The participants also learned about asset mapping, advocacy, and conflict resolution skills during the day, and bonded over games and a movie night in the evenings. Participants were invited to watch the movie, “Luther” to see the origins of the Lutheran faith come to life.

Book 5 was developed with the help of 6 member churches’ youth (ELCM, ECLIN, ELCB, ELCSA, MSCA, and ELCSA-­‐NT), under the guidance of Rev. Dr. Philip Knutson, LUCSA interim Christian Education Desk Officer.

The three pillars for Book 5 are “Transformation, Reconciliation, and Empowerment”. These three key words are essential to The Gospel, and were the foundation for the curriculum found in Book 5.

LUCSA hopes this book creates an impact, to be faithful and confessional Lutherans even to the rural areas of the southern Africa region. The participants each left with a complimentary copy of the LUCSA Book 5, and returned to their home churches with a better understanding of what it means for them to be an African Lutheran, and how they can fit the resources found in Book 5 into their own context.

Posted by in Christian Education
LUCSA Assembly delegates witness LUSA functioning

LUCSA Assembly delegates witness LUSA functioning

Students of the LUSA Varsity

JOHANNESBURG ‐ The delegates of the LUCSA Assembly witnessed the now operating Luther Varsity in Southern Africa (LUSA) as they visited the brainchild tertiary education center of LUCSA during the evening of 3rd September 2016. LUSA was registered as legal entity in 2014.

HIV/AIDS Youth Regional Peer Education workshop

Ms. Gugu Mkhabela Benoni,
South Africa, 17 May 2016

25 young adults and pastors gathered to explore the newly published LUCSA Christian Education Resource Book 5 at eMseni Christian Center in Benoni, South Africa from 14-­‐17 May 2016. The training workshop was unique for participants as they discussed what it means to be a young African Lutheran in today’s context.

Rev. Othusitse Morekwa, LUCSA Diakonia Desk Officer and contributor for Book 5, urged the participants to reflect on the curriculum and how they can translate it into their own cultures.

“We ought to invite the Lord, dwell on the text, share what we have heard in our hearts, and pray together,” he urged.

The youth were eager to express their own understandings of culture and how the church can play a role both in their spiritual life and personal life.

Mr. David Daniels from the Moravian Church in South Africa (MCSA) took the idea a step further by asking, “How are we as a church guiding our young people? Is the church responsible for the current situations in our countries, and the youth? How can we take this book back to our churches and impact our youth and young adults?”

Ms. Tlago Oliphant from the Ecumenical Accompanier Palestine Programme in Israel (EAPPI) capacitated the participants in advocacy and conflict resolution skills.

“It is my duty to be a mouth piece and tell stories of those who can’t tell their own stories,” Ms. Oliphant shared.

She asked the participants to consider what changes they want to see in their communities, “and that whatever change we want to do, or might want to bring in the church, we ought consider the feelings of other people.”
The participants also learned about asset mapping, advocacy, and conflict resolution skills during the day, and bonded over games and a movie night in the evenings. Participants were invited to watch the movie, “Luther” to see the origins of the Lutheran faith come to life.

Book 5 was developed with the help of 6 member churches’ youth (ELCM, ECLIN, ELCB, ELCSA, MSCA, and ELCSA-­‐NT), under the guidance of Rev. Dr. Philip Knutson, LUCSA interim Christian Education Desk Officer.

The three pillars for Book 5 are “Transformation, Reconciliation, and Empowerment”. These three key words are essential to The Gospel, and were the foundation for the curriculum found in Book 5.
LUCSA hopes this book creates an impact, to be faithful and confessional Lutherans even to the rural areas of the southern Africa region. The participants each left with a complimentary copy of the LUCSA Book 5, and returned to their home churches with a better understanding of what it means for them to be an African Lutheran, and how they can fit the resources found in Book 5 into their own context.

Posted by in Christian Education
LUCSA ASSEMBLY ELECTED A NEW PRESIDENT

LUCSA ASSEMBLY ELECTED A NEW PRESIDENT

From left: Bishop SVV. Nambala former LUCSA president welcomes Bishop H. Mueller to the cold chair of presidency.

The 9th LUCSA Assembly on September 3, 2016 elected for Bishop Horst Mueller of Evangelical Lutheran Church in South Africa –Natal Transvaal (ELCSA-­‐NT) as the new President and his deputy Bishop Dr Joseph P. Bvumbwe of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Malawi (ELCM) for a three years term of office running from 2016 to 2019.

Drought is not just an environmental problem

Allison Westerhoff,
Boksburg, South Africa, February 18, 2016

The annual Regional Planning Workshop for the Lutheran Communion in SouthernAfrica (LUCSA) gathered 27 HIV & AIDS Resource persons from the 10 southern African countries that make up the sub-regional expression of the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) in Johannesburg, South Africa from 15-19 February 2016. Participants presented reports from their churches offering insight into programmes and the successes and challenges, including issues of climate change.

Rev. Jesaja Jacky Lipito from the Evangelical Lutheran Church in amibia Eastern Dioceses (ELCIN-ED) offered a glimpse into the current challenges their church faces due to the drought during his report.

“We have had many difficulties because of the little amount of rain. eoples’ crops and cattle are dying,” he shared.

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Southern Africa South Eastern Dioceses (ELCSA-SED) also faced challenges with the drought. Their programme for People Living with IV (PLHIV) uses gardening as a way to empower members of the support group with agricultural skills and harvests of fresh produce, which also gives them the capacity to eat at least one meal a day to take their medication. This last year they planted over 20 bags of potatoes and there was no harvest because of the severe lack of rainfall.

The most implemented programme for PLHIV is the garden project. Four member churches and their diocese implement this ainstreaming programme currently. With this plague of minimal rainfall, an agricultural issue has become an HIV & AIDS problem.

In the coming 500th anniversary of the Reformation, one of the themes for the event is Creation: Not for Sale.” Under this theme, the importance of environmental stewardship is explored and the importance of the global church addressing the responsibility to take care of creation.

During the Regional Planning Workshop, the HIV & AIDS resource persons offered support to each other about how to overcome the challenges they face. There was not much that could be offered in addressing the severity of the drought. This challenge is something hat cannot easily be fixed in a conference room with a new HIV & AIDS programme implementation plan. This challenge needs to be addressed by the entire globe, with drastic changes to match the drastic effects of climate change.

On 12 December 2015, at the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) gathering in Paris, France, 186 countries brought forward their action plans on how they will reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Throughout the conference world eaders negotiated these action plans and next month in New York, those leaders can sign the agreement. If 55 countries, representing 55% of the emissions, sign this agreement there will be real change implemented.

As the participants of the Regional Planning Workshop return to their countries and home churches, they have a new zeal and more tools on how to address issues of HIV & AIDS. Although some of the projects are suffering because of climate change, the resource persons can find hope in the oming month that their global brothersand sisters will help implement change by signing an agreement that each country will be held accountable in caring for creation.

***
Photo: Ms. Gugu Mkhabela.

Posted by in Christian Education
Marangu Conference 2015

Marangu Conference 2015

The Lutheran leaders receive the youth and the banners they had carried over Mt. Kilimanjaro. The four-day climb focused on care for God’s creation. Photo: LWF/Tsion Alemayehu.

Dawson Chonjo poses next to the Africa Lutheran communion banner at Mt. Kilimanjaro’s highest peak on 22 May 2015.
Photo: Private

Harold Minja poses next to the Africa Lutheran communion banner at Mt. Kilimanjaro’s highest peak on 22 May 2015.
Photo: Private

LWF Council member Ms. Titi Malik and LWF President Bishop Munib A. Younan plant a commemorative tree for the 60th anniversary of the first Lutheran conference in Marangu.
Photo: LWF/Tsion Alemayehu

Ms. Blessing Shava and LWF Vice-President Bishop Dr. Alex G. Malasusa plant a commemorative tree for the 60th anniversary of the first Lutheran conference in Marangu.
Photo: LWF/Allison Westerhoff

The Lutheran leaders inaugurated the monument commemorating the first all-Africa Lutheran conference in 1955 at Marangu Teachers College.
Photo: LWF/ Nengida Lairumbe

A traditional performance at the Marangu celebration. Photo: LWF/Allison Westerhoff

Participants who were born, baptized or present at the Marangu conference in 1955 shake hands with the Lutheran leaders after a blessing. Photo: LWF/Allison Westerhoff

Rev. Dr. Philip Knutson of the ELCA is a native South African who was born and baptized in May 1955. Photo: LWF/ Allison Westerhoff

A soloist performs at the Marangu anniversary eucharistic service.
Photo: LWF/Allison Westerhoff

Rev. Joyceline Njama administers Holy Communion. Photo: LWF/Tsion Alemayehu

Holy Communion is distributed at the closing worship. Photo: LWF/ Tsion Alemayehu

Rev. Elfriede Katjizumo and Southern African delegates receive the “Marangu Banner”, symbolizing the journey to the 2017 Assembly in Windheok, Namibia.
Photo: LWF/Allison Westerhoff

Posted by in The Lutheran World Federation
African Lutheran Theologians Meeting 2014

African Lutheran Theologians Meeting 2014

November 10th-13th, 2014

The ALT (African Lutheran Theologians) met at Lakeview Airport Lodge to reflect on the relationship of biblical interpretation, human development and gender justice. The workshop is attended by participants from Ethiopia, Tanzania, South Africa, Madagascar, Zimbabwe, Cameroon, DRC, and Nigeria. Among the many issues that the participants deliberated on was the emphasis that Africa is deeply religious, and it is necessary to mobilize this religion for further development. It was observed that the biblical interpretation is central to this process as it can provide tools for critical thinking analysis and community mobilization. Through such empowering reading of the bible, the society in Africa can be developed.

Posted by in Christian Education
Africa Conference on Land Grabs

Africa Conference on Land Grabs

Gravitazz Continental Initiative (GCI), in collaboration with a number of civil society organisations including the Thabo Mbeki Leadership Institute, The Centre for African Renaissance, The UNISA School of Law, The Walter Sisulu University School of Law, Brilliance of Hope and Human Rights Institute of South Africa organised a conference from the 28-29 October 2014 addressing the new phenomemon of land grabbing on the African continent. Land Grabbing is loosely defined as the sudden rush by powerful multinationals, rich individuals and certain countries across the world to acquire large tracts of land for various purposes. These land transactions often target countries with weak land policies, carried out under questionable circumstances and have massive negative impact on the local populations. This conference was a culmination of over a year of planning, consultation and mobilisation of a wide spectrum of stakeholders across the African continent including private sector, NGOs, CBOs, academic institutions, traditional Leaders, UN agencies, governments and the various arms of the African Union especially the Pan-African Parliament and NEPAD. Various speakers hailed the occasion for being the First Conference on Land Grabs organised and held on the African Continent. The conference brought together academics, social movements, media, private sector representation, activists, UN representation, NGOs, researchers and delegates from outside of Africa.

Posted by in Christian Education
An African Woman’s Perspective of Reformation

An African Woman’s Perspective of Reformation

Rev. Madika Sibeko tells her perceptions of Reformation as a Methodist preacher during her key note address.

On October 27th in the Peace Chapel at Emseni Conference Center, Rev. Kasper led the opening worship to open the hearts of the present theologians. The women gathered at the Female Theologians Forum are from the 15 member churches LUCSA . All the women have studied theology or are in the process of studying, and are here to be empowered through community with other theologians. The hope of this forum is to further prepare for the 500th celebration of the Reformation that is to commence in Namibia in 2017.

Rev. Dr. David Tswaedi, the Executive Director of LUCSA, followed the chapel service with an opening blessing that poignantly opened the theme of the forum, “Rediscovering Grace: An African Woman’s Perspective on Reformation.” He reminded the women that this forum draws us to the centre of the Gospel, which is grace itself. “Grace is the pith, the centre, of the theme. Where grace is absent, the face of God is missing as well,” he concluded.

Then the Former Presiding Bishop of Namibia, Rev. Dr. Kameeta, led a short testimony of how his service in the office of the Bishop helped him to rediscover God’s grace and its renewing power. “God’s grace is nurturing like mothers milk,” he stated, “May you rediscover strength through God’s nurturing grace.”

The week will continue with sessions that are focused on what it means to be a Lutheran, to celebrate the reformation that has happened already with in the Lutheran church since the reformation, and how we can further reform in the coming 500 years.

Posted by in Christian Education
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